Graphic design graduate, photographer and art director Scarlet Evans is one of the six women behind Ladybeard, the feminist magazine that plays with perceptions of gender and sexuality.

How did completing a Graphic Design BA degree at Central St. Martins benefit you for a career post-university?

I’m not sure it prepared me for life after university – but it definitely instilled in me a work ethic and process that I think has stayed with me after leaving. It taught me to think.

Of your previous experience, what has been your favourite so far and why?

After leaving university, I went on and did the obligatory internships and made a lot of tea. As you can imagine, more often than not this wasn’t the most fulfilling work – so it was around this time that I started working on Ladybeard. I learnt so much more from doing this than I did at any internship, as I had responsibility that you rarely get as an intern. It was great – no one was telling me what to do or how to do it, so it forced me to learn on my own. I’d definitely say taking things into your own hands and finding some other way to get the experience that you might not be getting from an internship is really helpful!


"After leaving university, I went on and did the obligatory internships and made a lot of tea."

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Play time spread: Ladybeard, The Sex Issue

You were Lead Designer and Art Director for the Sex Issue of Ladybeard Magazine. How did you come to decide on the visual identity for the issue?

A lot of the content was quite serious, so we wanted to offset this with an aesthetic that was a bit lighter, making the heavy stuff a bit more digestible. We used a lot of bright colours, and big, playful type. We didn’t go into it with a completely mapped out vision for how we wanted it to be, it just kind of came together as we went along. We were keen that it should feel quite fluid – there are a lot of rules that we follow in our working lives, so it was really exciting for us to be able to essentially do whatever we wanted with it.

What were the main obstacles you faced when designing the magazine?

We all work on it in our spare time, so it can be hard balancing it with day jobs! This is why we only manage to get one issue out every hundred years. Aside from this, we started it with no experience in making magazines – it’s been a big learning curve for all of us. It’s been an invaluable lesson in making things happen. Every issue has felt like it would never happen, and then they always come together. That, I think, is one of the great things about being a small mag. It's all a bit touch and go until pretty much the very last minute and then it happens because you stay up for a week straight and suddenly you have a magazine!

"It's all a bit touch and go until pretty much the very last minute and then it happens because you stay up for a week straight and suddenly you have a magazine!"

Cover: Ladybeard, The Beauty Issue

How would you describe your creative process and the kind of skills that are involved in your work?

Everything needs to start with an idea, I do a lot of scribbling before I do any actual work. I like to map everything out and have a clear idea of what I want to do before I do it. Frustratingly in my working life, time to think is a real luxury as deadlines are always so mad! 

What plans do you have of where you want to take your work in the future?

I enjoy the variety in doing the magazine on the side, rather than as a full time job. But to be able to pay ourselves something one day would be great! In the future I’d love to do more side projects like Ladybeard. It’s so good to have a creative outlet – something that you do outside of work that is completely yours. We’ve done lots of events and workshops, which I’ve really enjoyed and would love to do more of – it’s always really exciting to see the magazine bringing people together and engaging people in real life!

"It’s so good to have a creative outlet - something that you do outside of work that is completely yours."

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Irun Kiko spread: Ladybeard, The Beauty Issue
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Cover: Ladybeard, The Sex Issue
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Spread: Ladybeard, The Mind Issue

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